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Thread: Food and Bedding Plots Are IN!

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  1. #1
    Senior Member Big_Holla's Avatar
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    Food and Bedding Plots Are IN!

    Boy I am glad to be finally writing this about the food and bedding plots we had been planning to do for some time down in Ohio. They're in as of last Sunday!! Talk about underestimating the job. After lugging and spreading around 60 bags of ag. lime, 10 bags of fertilizer and all the seed the 5 plots we had planned were finally done.

    We had sprayed the plot locations two weeks prior and when we arrived this past weekend we were happy to find they were good and dead. However, all the dead stuff was too long to till under without getting all tangled in the tiller. So we had to brush hog first. My buddy Ed had made the trip down late Thursday night and had planned to till all day, however he couldn't get started until I brought the brush hog down Friday evening. So he went and got all of the fertilizer and lime and did what he could until I arrived.

    Saturday started at 7 am and other than grabbing a sandwich in the midday we finally made it back to the house around 10 pm. We brush hogged all the plots and then tilled them all first, then spread the lime, fertilizer and seed. We were able to get the Old Saw food plot done and the Sanctuary Stand food plot as well. Sunday started at the same time and we think we had everything done and all the equipment loaded for our trek back to Michigan by around 3 pm. The last 3 plots were finished at the sanctuary bedding area. As I wrapped up those plots Ed went on and brush hogged paths around the property and even a path down through the big holla. To say we both were exhausted was an understatement.

    So, here is the results of our hard work so far.

    This is the Old Saw food plot location. It's a small field tucked back in a corner behind a bigger agricultural field, not sure what they are planting there yet. The field is separated from that big field with a thin strip of brush and trees, very secluded. Here we planted Whitetail Select Infinity Clover.

    This is what it looked like 2 weeks ago right after spraying.



    Here we are spreading the lime....heck I can still taste it!







    The final results........

    Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.
    - Thomas Edison


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    Senior Member Big_Holla's Avatar
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    The next plot we did was the Sanctuary Stand food plot. Here we also planted the same clover but one extra thing we did was to plant a wide strip of sorghum to separate the food plot from the rest of the field and sanctuary. We did this to give it a more secluded feel, just hope it works.

    Left to right, the stand is in the second picture if you can spot it.







    Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.
    - Thomas Edison


  3. #3
    Senior Member Big_Holla's Avatar
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    The last 3 plots all are in our sanctuary. We have never been satisfied with how well the sanctuary has held deer over the years but an agreement with my uncle on our land contract was to only keep the main field in grasses or a crop, and to not to let trees grow other than the crab apple, etc. that are already there. So, here we decided to plant some switch grass for bedding and one strip in sorghum and soybeans.

    Here is Ed putting the final touches on these plots with the brush hog.





    Pictures of the 3 strips are from left to right. The left most strip is all switch grass.



    The middle strip kind of joins the left most and here I planted mostly sorghum on the left side of the strip and soybeans on the right side. Seed did overlap and will be interesting to see how it grows. We realize the beans will be eaten fast and likely will not grow much. That is OK if it keeps the browse down on the clover plot by the treestand. Also, if we have open ground by September we will go over it with a brassica mix.



    The right most strip runs parallel to the middle strip and has a section of grass between the two. Here I planted all switch grass.



    This sanctuary bedding is within sight of the stand we have where we planted the clover. Will be interesting to see how they utilize the whole area. Our plan for next year will be to add more strips of switch grass, provided it works like we are hoping.
    Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.
    - Thomas Edison


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    Senior Member mrbb's Avatar
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    well welcome to the food plot world LOL
    the first plot we did at my cabin, we did it all with a truck, pulled a small disc, and then we had to add 5 tons of lime, and having no lime spreader we improvised, we used my snowmobile trailer, a ton of 40 lb bags of pulverized lime at a time, with 5 guys on the trailer and girlfriend driving thet truck, 2 guys cutting bags open and the rest pouring them off the end of the trailer
    Talks about work and tasting lime! think it took 2 yrs to get the lime out of my truck, as the windoew were down while towing us about
    the local farmer driving by gave us some funny looks for sure, but hey it got it done

    all your's look nice, and should pay off big in the yrs to come
    Its a rewarding thing to start and then finish a food plot, or I sure think so

    as for your beans, they might last longer than you think, cause,. deer like all new foods , all the mroe so when there ender, so they should be hitting all of it, and not just the beans, making them last longer

    If you can, in about 3-4 weeks, if you can hit the clover and beans with a couple bags of Urea, it will give them a great boost
    and if there round up ready beans, come bacjk and spray them when they get to about10-12 inches tall
    this way if they get hammered buy Aug, you can very easily just grab a bag of CHeap Agway rape seed(same as a brassicia) and just broadcast some seds in the beans in a rain
    and they will come up, as long as its pertty weed free
    I been doing this for a couple yrs now with great luck, the taller beans seem to provide a little cover the deer like as they eat the brassicia./rape then !
    My local Agway sells a 50 lb bag for 48 bucks, can plant like 6+ acres with that, but they also sell it by the lb too!
    much cheaper than a brand name for almost the same stuff, and since it has to be planted every yr, an easy boost to a beans plot that has been worked hard by the deer, and a pain free planting too!

  5. #5
    Senior Member Big_Holla's Avatar
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    Not a bad idea on the Round-Up in a few weeks mrbb as I know they are Round-Up ready. Just don't want to kill out the sorghum though as I really want that tall wall of stuff there. Like my buddy said too, we can rough up the ground some this summer if they are all ate off and plant some more beans again. Cannot wait to get back down there in the next couple months to see the progress. Will update here if and when I do.
    Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.
    - Thomas Edison


  6. #6
    Senior Member hortontoter's Avatar
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    Those are going to be some great plots. All the rain we have had should help things along. I quit maintaing my small plot this year as it never really panned out due to not enough sun reaches it. I'll keep the edges mowed as many scrapes appear along the edges every fall.
    I may be opinionated...but, my opinion is the only one that matters anyway.

  7. #7
    Senior Member mrbb's Avatar
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    well I hear you on having some cover in a plot, it does seem to help deer come out sooner
    one of the reasons I been thinking about trying them hybred soybeans they have now that grow to 6 ft tall, as if I could get them about half of that, I think that would be awespme , but I hear you really need to fence it off to get that height in them.

    they do sell I am sure some chemical that will help keep grass out but not hurt the sorghum, I think its 2-4-d, its a widly used chemical in many of todays comercial food crops
    see below
    just something to think about
    as like I said, if you cna keep it some what weed free, come lat Aug, it should be a good place to throw some rape seed and have a new food source just before winter


    this is the stuff, just make sure its mixed right, like all chemicals, thats key to them working the right way!
    I am like 99% sure it will not hurt round up ready beans too! but double check, know its safe on round up ready corn, so think there the same deal, but not 100 %
    2,4-D
    2,4-D is a broadleaf killer that has been around under many brand names for many years. It will not kill grasses. Grain sorghum infested with coffeeweed, ragweed, jimsonweed, morning glory or any other broadleaf qualifies for 2,4-D application. Grain sorghum is a little sensitive to 2,4-D, so read the label carefully and do not increase the label rate. Atrazine is a great herbicide for grain sorghum or corn, but is a controlled chemical requiring a private pesticide applicator license. 2,4-D,, is available over the counter with no license required.

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